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The Best Girl Scout Cookies—Ranked

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When Girl Scouts started selling cookies in the early 1900s, the scouts and their mothers whipped them up in their own kitchens. Now, there are two commercial bakeries that make the delicious treats, which explains both why the cookies are not exactly the same everywhere and how there are so many yummy choices.

Since the inception of these cookie sales, there have been dozens of Girl Scout Cookie flavors and varieties. Some have been huge hits, while others were major misses. While taste is certainly subjective and favorites vary from person to person and state to state, some of the confections have left an indelible impression as a whole. Many were briefly popular while others have been beloved for decades.

Take a mouthwatering look at the best cookies Girl Scouts have had to offer, counting down to the ultimate fave.

And if you find yourself craving the sweet treats, no worries! You can buy them year-round online.

20. Forget-Me-Nots

These old-fashioned cookies were a cross between oatmeal and granola and contained lots of raisins. Apparently, the name of these treats referred to a once-popular troop crest featuring the flower and not the cookie itself. Forget-Me-Nots were introduced in 1979 but only remained available until 1981.

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19. Olé Olés

A sort of Mexican wedding cookie with a little coconut tossed in for good measure, these cookies showed up in 2001. The vanilla, pecans and shredded coconut balls powdered with confectioners sugar were fleetingly favorited because they were low-fat. Perhaps the powdered sugar was too messy, because these cookies disappeared after 2003.

Adobe | anidimi

18. Mango Cremes

Perhaps the most polarizing of all Girl Scout Cookies, Mango Cremes were vanilla cookies sandwiching a mango-flavored filling that contained a little something extra. The confections included something called “Nutrifusion,” which reportedly provided 15 percent of the Recommended Daily Intake for several nutrients. While some people scarfed them down, others were put off by the scent, which some compared to sunscreen or air freshener.

Adobe | AnnyStudio

17. Echo

In the ’80s, Girl Scouts offered a rich, chocolatey cookie sandwich with creamy vanilla filling. These were basically Oreos, but buying them carried the bonus of helping adorable Daisies and Brownies. While Girl Scouts outsell Oreos overall during the cookie-selling season, Echoes couldn’t cut it in the long run. They were only available from 1987 until 1989.

Adobe | New Africa

16.Rah-Rah Raisins

Another raisin cookie to make the list, these were not your Grandma’s cookies. The sandy, crumbly confections had chewy raisins and sweet yogurt bits throughout. The crumbliness and the cost ($3.50 for six cookies) might have been their downfall, as the cookies were only available from 2014 to 2016.

Adobe | eqroy

15. Snaps

Not to be confused with gingersnaps, Girl Scout Snaps were firm, round oatmeal cookies with sweet, light icing. From 1994 to 1997, Snaps were beloved by some. Although they lasted for four cookie seasons, however, the crispy goodies were eventually phased out.

Adobe | Brent Hofacker

14. Juliettes

Juliette Gordon Low founded the Girl Scouts in 1912, so it only seems fitting that there would be a cookie named after her. In fact, there have been two. In 1984, Juliettes were packages containing two flavors of daisy-shaped shortbread: one sleeve of lemon and one sleeve of pecan praline cookies in each box. They were only available until 1985. However, in 1993, a new type of Juliettes was introduced. The crunchy caramel pecan and chocolate-coated sweets were available until 1996.

Adobe | locotearts

13. Lemon Chalet Cremes

The sandwich cookies, which were sometimes rectangular and sometimes round, were a lemony hit until they weren’t. Decorated with sweet Swiss houses for part of their existence, the cookies came to a disappointing demise. Chalet Cremes came out in 2007. In 2010, they were recalled due to issues with their taste and smell. Consumers complained about the same problem in 2011, and they were removed from the list of Girl Scout Cookies permanently.

Adobe | oqba

12. Dulce De Leche

Inspired by popular Latin American confections called alfajores, Dulce De Leche cookies came out in 2008 and stuck around until 2014. The bite-size goodies were studded with rich caramel chips. Not only were they sweet and delicious, but they were also appreciated for their calorie count. You could enjoy four of the cookies for just 160 calories.

Adobe | Jaimie Duplass

11. Thank U Berry Munch

These cookies had the texture of pecan sandies, but with cranberry bits and white chocolate chips mixed in. Introduced in 2009, the sweet, tart confections were an instant hit. Thank U Berry Munch cookies were available through the 2014 season.

Adobe | la_vanda

10. Van’chos

If you have ever had to shop for kids (or grownups) with notably different tastes, you know that something as simple as choosing between vanilla or chocolate cookies can be a headache. In 1974, Van’chos came to the rescue. The Oreo-like sandwich cookies included both vanilla (Van) and chocolate (cho) in a single package. Sadly, these simple goodies disappeared after 1983.

Adobe | ksena32

9. Girl Scout S’mores

Frankly, we’re surprised these didn’t come along sooner. Seriously, what could be more scout-like than s’mores? Although they’re all called S’mores, there are two distinct versions of this cookie. In some parts of the country, they’re made up of graham crackers with a smear of marshmallow coated in chocolate. In others, they’re graham-like sandwich cookies with layers of chocolate and marshmallow in between. S’mores debuted in 2016.

Adobe | KCULP

8. Toffee-Tastic

For people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, these Girl Scout cookies are a godsend. The rich, buttery goodies are certified gluten-free. Since becoming part of the cookie lineup in 2014, they have remained a favorite.

Adobe | KCULP

7. Savannah Smiles

These bright, zesty treats dusted with powdered sugar were introduced in 2011 in some markets. Other markets instead have a slice-shaped shortbread cookie with lemon icing called Lemonades. Both became available in 2011.

Adobe | michellesc

6. Thanks-A-Lot

These simple yet delicious shortbread cookies have a chocolate coating. They also have the words “Thank you” in English, French, Chinese, Swahili or Spanish imprinted on each treat. Thanks-a-Lot cookies have been around since 2008.

girl scout photo
Getty Images | Paul Morigi

5. Do-Si-Dos

Simply called Peanut Butter Sandwiches in some markets, these cookies are just that. Two crunchy oatmeal cookies sandwich a creamy peanut butter filling. These lunchbox favorites have stood the test of time since they were introduced back in 1974.

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4. Trefoils

Known as Shortbread in some Girl Scout Cookie markets, Trefoils got their name from the three-leaf plant of the same name. Each leaf stands for one of the oaths in the Girl Scout Promise. The beloved confections were initially introduced in 1974.

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3. Tagalongs

Tagalongs, aka Peanut Butter Patties, depending on where you live, are crisp cookies with a creamy layer of peanut butter. Did we mention that they’re dipped in chocolate? These chocolatey, peanut buttery delights have remained popular since 1976.

Adobe | KCULP

2. Samoas

Whether you know them as Samoas or as Caramel deLites, you likely know them as decadent and delicious. Each ring-shaped goodie is topped with toasted coconut, caramel and chocolate. These treasured treats have endured since 1974.

Adobe | KCULP

1. Thin Mints

According to Girl Scouts of America, Thin Mints, which were introduced back in 1974, are the most popular type of cookie they sell. It’s not hard to see why, as the crisp, minty, chocolate-covered treats are borderline addictive. In fact, one of the two commercial bakeries that produce the cookies reportedly bakes up to nearly five million a day during each cookie-selling season.

Pro tip: Buy extra and keep them in the freezer; they’re heavenly when cold.

Adobe | KCULP